Archives for posts with tag: Jesse Oviatt

Matt came up with it. Jesse and I started it. I continued it. And Jesse will finish it.

What, you may ask, am I talking about? The drip cap that runs around our house. When Matt finalized the window design, he did it in a way that made the top of every window at the same level, and the bottom of every window that sits above the ground also in line.

This design element allowed an opportunity to create a deep drip edge below each window. Here’s my take on what this allows.

First, it creates a window sill, which is super functional, keeping water that might hit the windows away from the siding. And given our windy meadow, water on the windows is a reality.

Second, it adds a beefy horizontal band to an already very horizontal house. Not only does this break up the siding, but it plays to an already strong design theme. In a lot of ways our house is all about the horizontal. The site is wide. The meadow is wide. The hillside behind us is wide.

Finally, it’s a nod to other architectural styles we like. It’s a very Japanese and Craftsman detail. I really love how Matt has pulled in traditional details in a modern way. We have this in a number of other places throughout the house too. Some other time I’ll take a few pictures of these, but realistically need to wait until the finish work is underway.

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Installed trim! That's the color the house will be painted too.

As hanging drywall comes to a close the house looks more and more habitable. Well, habitable if you love the smell of gypsum dust. Our dog certainly does. She loves the way it smells and tastes in fact. I think drywall has a bunch of salt in it, so Sacha goes around the house licking the floors which also makes her thirsty. So she drinks water then licks more dust.

As a result, we gave her a new nickname this weekend. Cokehead. Why? Well her nose was coated in white powder and she was frantically running around the house looking for new piles of the powdery white stuff.

I’ve posted a few new pictures below, but they don’t really do the place justice. Taping and mudding start tomorrow. Soon enough we’ll have smooth primed walls ready for us to start finish work in earnest.

I love getting to know the different styles and personalities of the subcontractors working on site. Every now and then I also hear something so funny I almost wet myself. The drywall hangers were rocking out, listening to some relaxing heavy metal blasting loud enough that they could hear it over the scream of their routers and drills.

Jesse and I were talking in the garage, where we could hear, when all of the sudden I hear one of the guys talking/yelling. Here’s the quote: “man, if I quit drinking and lost my gut I’d look like an Ethiopian!”

At the time it seemed especially funny.

On other fronts we’ve also started exterior trim ahead of the siding going up. Jesse and I are collaborating on this part of the project, with K helping out too.

This weekend I got into some compound miter action at the master bedroom. This is always tricky work, but turned out nicely. The integral window sill/drip cap angles down and at the corner also needs a 45 degree miter.

I really love the way it looks. A nice mellow trapezoid shape. Sort of.

I'm not sure what I like more. The new fascia, or the sunset reflected in the windows.

Jesse and Scott have been framing the inside of the house for almost three weeks. All things considered they’ve made impressive progress. They’re just a few walls and soffits away from finishing up, and if all goes well (famous last words!) should wrap things up in the next few days.
We’re having a good time walking around the house. The rooms are all in (save a powder and utility room) so it’s quite easy to imagine the flow, the light and the final finish details. K spends a lot of time quietly looking around, taking things in. Fun.
This morning something exciting happened though. Another milestone. Installation of the roof began.
Of course, as has been the case more than once, the weather foiled carefully laid plans. Today’s culprits were rain and wind. Again. We’ll have a metal roof via our friends at BJ Roofing and Custom Bilt. But given the 30 mph wind, this was sketchy. A 5o’ long piece of metal acts a lot like a sail evidently, so the forming truck that rolls out the metal was sent packing, and instead installation of our metal fascia began.
As an aside, BJ Roofing is one of those Spokane companies that few have heard of in town, but everyone seems to know other places. Brad Hemenway recently returned from re-roofing a Frank Lloyd Wright house in California, and he’s regularly called on to do some pretty whiz-bang copper work. Luckily he lives a few miles from our place and agreed to help us, too.
After some healthy obsession about roof color, we decided to stick with our original choice of “zincalume.” This ties in with the galvanized metal in our brackets nicely and helps keep our palate of materials consistent. ¬†And it looks so stinking cool. My “stinking cool” is K’s “shing-shing sparkly.” Matt’s pretty thrilled with it too.
So over the next couple of weeks we’ll have a literal roof over our heads. And after watching water pour down the wood soffit we so carefully installed, this couldn’t make me more relieved.

As framing continues, sometimes it’s hard for me to keep our focus on the current work. Don’t get me wrong. The boys are doing an unbelievable job framing. It’s just that as soon as we get through one thing, I get even more excited about the next. Plus, the rooms are all nicely defined now, which leads to discussions about fun stuff like final finish details, and we’re looking forward to jumping out of our skin about the promise of next week’s metal roof installation.

I popped by the site yesterday, once again resplendent in inappropriate/non-construction clothes. I was greeted by the sound of progress–the pop-pop of pnuematic nailers–as I carefully navigated the uneven ground like a peacock on an ice-skating rink in my fancy shoes.

Jesse and Scott have been working through the kitchen and dining room framing, installing the final blocking and “pony” walls. Not only do things look great, they also look incredibly fun. Our storage soffits, for the moment anyway, look like the longest set of playground monkeybars I’ve ever seen. My dad said something to the effect of, “Wow, it looks like something they’d use to train Marines.”

In any case, it’s all very cool and exciting. And suddenly, it’s much easier to envision the dance of drywall, plywood, and light that we’ve been working towards for so many months.

The last few days have seen some pretty extreme weather. Sunny skies. No wait, hail. No wait, sun. Look, a blizzard! So when I came to visit yesterday within about 15 minutes we had a good half-inch of snow on the roof. Until it all melted 10 minutes later. So here’s the deal. A 5,000 s.f. roof with a bunch of snow, which suddenly melts.

This is a less-than-perfect video, but Scott and I went running out to the entry court to quite a site. We of course don’t have our gutters installed yet, so had the chance to witness a pretty stunning waterfall/water feature. And yes, we’re thinking about how to create some kind of cool aqueduct thing to make this a regular occurence. Maybe.

Just try to get two six-year-olds to stop running. I dare you.

We had a tiring, but productive, weekend. Saturday morning my father and I met Jesse and my neighbor Doug on site for an extravaganza of heavy lifting. Totally macho. Or something.

Here’s the story. Our windows were delivered the same day as our concrete pour, which had been rescheduled from a few days earlier. So as a result there was nowhere to store the windows on site. Our good friends two doors away offered to allow us to store them in our garage. Problem solved!

Sort of.

The windows are massive. All the doors and most of the windows are eight feet tall. This makes for a very heavy window. The heaviest? Close to 500 pounds. Oh yeah, and we also have a pretty extensive window package. So not only are the windows hefty, but there are many of them.

But a few hours of work and the job was done.

So now it’s on to installation. Jesse is taking the lead on that and I hired a friend, Scott McSpadden, to help me with installation of the soffit. See the picture below, but we have 75 sheets of plywood for the soffit, which is the area under the roof. I love our house design, but it’s going to take a while to get this work done. We have a 2,190 s.f. house (plus the garage). And yet we have 2,200 s.f. of roof overhangs. Good times.

Finally, we’re just about through the big stuff with kitchen cabinets. We even mocked up our kitchen in our rental house. Fun stuff!

Here’s to a productive week.

We took a small break from cabinet-making today. Well, we did build one cabinet box early in the morning, but spent most of the day working with Jesse installing house wrap. OK, not the most exciting thing to do, but we’re one step closer to installing windows, which should start tomorrow.

It was absolutely beautiful today too. We lucked out. No rain, no wind, no worries. And mundane task aside, it was actually pretty fun. Plus, three sets of hands helped things go quickly.

I forgot my semi-good camera today, but here are a few snaps to check out. The good people at R-Control will be quite happy. The house is now a giant R-Contol billboard.

More to come.